“I’m glad you came:” Coming to worship FOR someone else

You may or may not be familiar with the British boy band The Wanted (I had no idea who they were, just familiar with the song), but there is a familiar sentiment echoed in the chorus on their hit song, “I’m glad you came.” Whether in a party, club, or worship service, there is familiarity that doesn’t bring contempt. In fact, just the mere presence of someone familiar, or even familial, can bring comfort to the weary soul. Not just when you join “forces” or rather voices in song, but afterwards.

At the request of a member who has been unable to attend worship for some time due to health reasons, we have decided to live stream the services through the Facebook Live feature. After 3 weeks, and an engineer who purchased, placed, and positioned the correct apparatus for my Iphone, I think we have most of the ins and outs nailed down. I love this possibility for those who can’t make it to worship due to sickness or travel.

I’m a pastor, so obviously I highly encourage all Christians to find a place to worship on Sundays (or Sat services). I’ve yet to meet one who doesn’t. I’ve written of many reasons why I believe putting yourself in the path of grace on a weekly basis is important, but one such elusive reason seems to have hit me like a foul ball. Your presence in worship could be just as vital for someone else faith as it was for your own.  

Let me explain. After worship concluded a few weeks ago, it was business as usual: people chatting, kids bouncing balls (we meet in a gym), folks stacking chairs. But in one corner of the gym, I noticed a circle of people huddled together praying. It was our missions team praying over our plans for the new fishing ministry, asking for guidance and blessing.

A homeless man came to church that week because we had given him a gas card to look for work. One of our leaders wasn’t at worship, so I simply passed this gentlemen on to another more equipped than I to discern the need. Another leader soon joined in the corner by the pool.

This past week a gal had a really rough week and another dear sister came with hugs and a listening ear.

Sometimes you may not feel like coming to worship, but another may be very glad you came. Have you considered that you’re not coming simply for yourself. Maybe it’s your kids, or maybe the kids or parents of another? A single, a widow or widower? Your availability is all that it takes for you to play a major role in someone’s life that day or that week. Maybe they needed your story more than mine, or more than his, or hers?

On Sundays when the only thing stopping you is “I don’t really feel like it,” would you do your brothers and sisters in the faith a solid, and consider someone may need my singing, hands, ears, tears, or my prayers? Consider that someone may say to you in one way or another, “I’m glad you came.” At the very least, when you are able to come, you’ll mindset will move from consumer of grace to a conduit of grace as the service concludes.

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