What the Blacklist can teach us about Predestination

I’m never able to preach everything that I’d like to preach on a Sunday morning. I know that some folks might not believe me, but I actually edit out a ton of stuff on Saturdays. I promise. And not only that, I just can’t mention everything which I’d like to when covering large portions of scripture as we’ve been doing on Sunday mornings through our “Footloosed” series in Acts.

A few weeks ago, I was unable to get to properly cover this verse in Acts 13:48.

 And when the Gentiles heard this, they began rejoicing and glorifying the word of the Lord, and as many as were appointed to eternal life believed.

The NIV, New King James, and ESV all translate the word “appointed.”

What this teaches us is that many heard the gospel message, but only some believed. Why? I can’t see any other way to interpret this than God had already chosen them to believe.

But what about those who didn’t believe? Did they simply not believe, because God had not chosen them? No.

“When the Jews saw the crowds, they were filled with jealousy. They began to contradict what Paul was saying and heaped abuse on him. Then Paul and Barnabas answered them boldly: “We had to speak the word of God to you first. Since you reject it and do not consider yourselves worthy of eternal life, we now turn to the Gentiles.”  Acts 13:45-46

We are told that they rejected the message not because they weren’t appointed for life but because “they did not consider themselves worthy of eternal life.” Left to our own devices we will not choose Jesus. In C.S. Lewis The Great Divorce he imagines an after-life conversation betwixt a Christian in heaven and one who has recently passed on. Just as the Jews did in Acts 13, the liberal priest still chooses to reject Jesus as THE answer.

These great mysteries cannot be approached in that way. If there were such a thing (there is no need to interrupt, my dear boy) quite frankly, I should not be interested in it. It would be of no religious significance. God, for me, is something purely spiritual. The spirit of sweetness and light and tolerance— and, er, service, Dick, service. We mustn’t forget that, you know.’

C.S. Lewis, who as far as I know does not believe in Predestination, actually draws out the logical conclusion of Reformed thought. Unless the heart is changed, it will never choose life but remain hardened. Even when proven otherwise. Something must happen for him to believe.

Now you might think that would make one arrogant, to believe in such a doctrine. And honestly, for many, it has. So I get why many people do reject the doctrine up front. I don’t blame you.

But would you be open to considering that the opposite doctrine could also have the same result?

In the show The Blacklist, there is a very elusive character who seems to fly under the radar of any place he goes. Finally the FBI (I believe) catches him. The unit director then begins to boast in his own abilities. We found him. The main character on the show quickly retorts, “If you found him, it is because he wanted to be found by you.”

This “being found because he wanted to be found” belief was intended to humble them, not make them feel prouder of what they had accomplished. This concept, the humility it can produce and the glory which can then be given to God, is the main reason why I would commend folks to not simply thrust aside this doctrine.

Everyone does have to make a choice whether to put faith or not put faith in Jesus. But consider that there might be a reason that you “chose” Him and someone else hasn’t. Can you chalk that up to your spirituality, your foresight, long range planning, wisdom? Or perhaps you found him because He wanted you to find him….?

Regardless whether or not you hold to this doctrine, the fruit of what we believe must lead us to love. If Reformed Theology doesn’t make you more humble, than you are definitely living inconsistently with it’s purpose (bring all Glory to God), and drawing illogical conclusions. In the end, we are ultimately not to be known by our doctrine but by our love for one another (John 13:35). And our motivation to love is because he first loved us, even while we were yet enemies (Romans 5:8).

In the end, where ever we land on this controversial doctrine, let us love well, and be very charitable to others with theological differences. If we look to the Son, we are all on the same team (John 6:40).

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